Posts Tagged: ESPON

Ten messages if you are Planning for Growth

Planning for growth means making use of local assets

In my last couple of Blogs I have covered issues around planning for growth. This one continues that theme by looking at messages in ESPON research that give pointers to territorial actions that would put “Planning for Growth” into practice. Place-based economic development – The theme of “Planning for Growth” dominated the ESPON INTERSTRAT one day conference in London on 30 September. In this blog I summarise the presentation that I made. For simplicity, I picked out ten messages that are embedded in a number of ESPON research projects and that point the way for “Planning for Growth”. If the UK government is really serious about trying to use the planning system in England to plan for growth, they are the kind of things that could be considered. Similarly, they provide an agenda for discussion – and adaptation fit the local context – in other places…..

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Planning for Growth: Innovation

There is a clear message that comes from the modern literature about competitiveness. In a knowledge economy, competitiveness is closely tied to innovation. However, innovation is not a linear process from men in white coats in laboratories through to a commercially successful product. Indeed many innovations that are brought to the market come from companies that do not have an R and D function. Rather innovation comes from multiple feedbacks, absorbing messages from customers, sharing tacit knowledge, a willingness to experiment. Thus regions can be important catalysts for innovation. How do we build these insights into plans for growth? Read more on Planning for Growth: Innovation…

Austerity, Territorial Cohesion and Planning for Growth

As the Eurozone teeters on the brink, what future patterns of regional change look likely? How does today’s crisis relate to the idea of territorial cohesion? A major conference in London on Friday will look at Planning for Growth from a European perspective. What are likely to be the key themes and what can the evidence from the ESPON programme add to debates in England about the future of planning? Read more on Austerity, Territorial Cohesion and Planning for Growth…

7M Euros for research will probe resilience, poverty and indicators

Regional resilience in the face of economic crises; small and medium sized towns; and the territorial dimension of poverty and social exclusion in Europe are amongst 16 new research projects being tendered by ESPON this week. There is also a project on the use of indicators in national spatial planning that is the brainchild of the Scottish government. In all, ESPON is committing almost 7.5 million Euros to this phase of its research. Read more on 7M Euros for research will probe resilience, poverty and indicators…

Planning for the Knowledge Economy

As the UK government urges planning authorities to plan for growth and Local Enterprise Partnerships set out to boost local economies, what do we know about spatial trends in the knowledge economy?

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ESPON and The EU’s Territorial Agenda

Budapest

What can local and regional authorities do to speed economic recovery? What kind of actions are needed to make the pattern of development more sustainable? How can we make places more inclusive?  The Territorial Agenda of the European Union 2020 (TA), agreed by the Ministers responsible for spatial planning last month, aspires to point the path “Towards an Inclusive, Smart and Sustainable Europe of Diverse Regions”.  Now I am at the ESPON meeting in the Royal Palace at Godollo, Hungary that seeks to explore what knowledge is needed to take the TA forward and to inform the EU’s Cohesion Policy after 2013. Read more on ESPON and The EU’s Territorial Agenda…

Making cities and regions more resilient

Flooding in Downtown Brisbane earlier this year. Photo courtesy of Phil Heywood.

This is an exciting time. There is a new confidence in economic geography and regional science. We are seeing the emergence of a set of concepts and propositions that have strong and direct implications for policy makers and practitioners. One of these is the notion of urban and regional resilience. It has been described as a “steering model” for urban and regional development. It offers some pointers for planners and regeneration and economic development professionals. Read more on Making cities and regions more resilient…

Cross-border development:learning from Newry-Dundalk twin city

Across the world, administrative boundaries, and particularly international borders, are blocks to economic development,  management of energy and conservation of natural resources. Rivers flow across frontiers, where flood prevention measures differ. National energy policies and grids constrain efficiency. Small towns split by a border struggle against larger economic hubs.  The culture of officialdom looks inwards. However, across Europe border barriers are being tackled through spatial planning and economic development. Local blinkers are being replaced by new forms of co-operation and policy-making. Read more on Cross-border development:learning from Newry-Dundalk twin city…

How will Europe’s regions respond to migration?

I am one of Europe’s growing cohort of old age pensioners. In 31 European countries, even if life expectancy does not improve, the population aged 65+ would increase by 40 per cent to 2050. If life expectancy continues to grow, the number of persons aged 65+ will leap by between 87 and 111 per cent. However, with out-migration and low birth rates, many of Europe’s regions face the prospect of a population that is both ageing and reducing in numbers. Unless things change, 60% of European regions will experience population decline up to 2050. Demography is a key factor in the development and planning of cities and region: what are Europe’s prospects and what are the implications? Read more on How will Europe’s regions respond to migration?…